2021 discount A Rope high quality and discount a Prayer: A Kidnapping from Two Sides online

2021 discount A Rope high quality and discount a Prayer: A Kidnapping from Two Sides online

2021 discount A Rope high quality and discount a Prayer: A Kidnapping from Two Sides online

Description

Product Description

The compelling and insightful account of a New York Times reporter''s abduction by the Taliban, and his wife''s struggle to free him.

From Publishers Weekly

For a harrowing seven months of captivity, Rohde, a Pulitzer Prize–winning New York Times foreign correspondent on assignment in war-torn Afghanistan, survived after being kidnapped, with two Afghan colleagues, by the Taliban in November 2008, suffering from all of the cruel terrorist maneuvering and hapless government countermoves during the crisis. Rohde wrote a series of articles for the Times about his experiences, but here Rohde alternates chapters with Mulvihill, to whom he had been married for two months at the time of his kidnapping. In suspenseful prose, he recounts his abduction and she describes her efforts, along with those of the Times, to secure his release by writing everyone in government and negotiating with the Taliban. Rohde''s escape, with one of his colleagues, received major media coverage. Possibly the most informative segments of the book are the masterly observations of life with the jihadists, the chaotic Pakistani tribal areas and the topsy-turvy war itself. This potent story of love and conflict ends well, but not without making some smart and edgy commentary on terrorism, hostage negotiation, political agendas, and the human heart. Map. (Nov.)
(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

New York Times reporter Rohde writes about his ordeal as a hostage of the Taliban, after he was kidnapped in Afghanistan in November 2008. Rohde covered most of this story in a five-part series in the New York Times, available online. The new element here is the juxtaposition of his narrative with that of his wife’s, Kristen Mulvihill, who describes her own agony and quest to have Rohde freed. Even though the pieces are in place for a thrilling account from both parties, the writing on Mulvihill’s part feels flat and predictable. This may be because, as with the accounts of the Daniel Pearl tragedy from his wife’s perspective, we already know the outcome. Rohde’s portion is by far the most readable. His accounts of the difficulties of reporting from this danger-pocked landscape and his descriptions of his second-guessing himself about his reporting choices are especially compelling. --Connie Fletcher

Review

A WASHINGTON POST BEST NONFICTION BOOK OF 2010: Rohde and Mulvihill, his wife, alternate chapters in this harrowing account... delivering an important and valuable story of love, faith and courage." Philip Caputo --The Washington Post

EDITORS'' CHOICE, THE NEW YORK TIMES: "A love story as well as a political drama... required reading for anyone who is a fan of Steve Coll''s Ghost Wars, Rory Stewart''s Places In Between or Ahmed Rashid''s Taliban." Doug Stanton --N. Y. Times

DAILY BEAST FAVORITE BOOK OF THE YEAR: "The singular and harrowing account of a journalist''s captivity in the most important place on earth, and what it means to be the one left behind." Eliza Griswold --The Daily Beast

"Smart, deep thoughts, won at very high cost." David Shribman --The Boston Globe

EIGHT GREAT PICKS FOR THE FALL: "The book is riveting." John Searles --The Today Show

From the Author

Based on the award winning New York Times series "Held by the Taliban."

Winner, 2010 George Polk, Michael Kelly and American Society of Newspaper Editors awards; winner, Medill Medal for Courage in Journalism.
Finalist, 2010 Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting

From the Inside Flap

Invited to an interview by a Taliban commander,  New York Times reporter David Rohde and two Afghan colleagues were kidnapped in November 2008 and spirited to the tribal areas of Pakistan. For the next seven months, they lived in an alternate reality, ruled by jihadists, in which paranoia, conspiracy theories, and shifting alliances abounded. Held in bustling towns, they found that Pakistan''s powerful military turned a blind eye to a sprawling Taliban ministate that trained suicide bombers, plotted terrorist attacks, and helped shelter Osama bin Laden. 

In New York, David''s wife of two months, Kristen Mulvihill, his family, and  The New York Times struggled to navigate the labyrinth of issues that confront the relatives of hostages. Their methodical, Western approach made little impact on the complex mix of cruelty, irrationality, and criminality that characterizes the militant Islam espoused by David''s captors. 

In the end, a stolen piece of rope and a prayer ended the captivity. The experience tested and strengthened Mulvihill and Rohde''s relationship and exposed the failures of American effort in the region. The tale of those seven months is at once a love story and a reflection of the great cultural divide-and challenge-of our time.

From the Back Cover

"Only in the hands of gifted writers could this many-layered tale be told. A Rope and a Prayer is simultaneously a thrilling narrative, a brilliant look at  the war in Afghanistan, a meditation on journalism and a moving love story." 

- Doris Kearns Goodwin, author of Team of Rivals
"David Rohde has survived one of the most terrifying things that can happen to a foreign reporter. His account of captivity with the Taliban illuminates important things about courage, about war - and also about marriage. His wife, Kristen, is the real hero of this story. This is a brilliant, beautifully-written book and I could not read it fast enough." 
- Sebastian Junger, author of War and The Perfect Storm
"This is an honest, moving, painful and riveting book about war, love, kidnapping, journalism, family and the war in Afghanistan. It brims with the authors'' care and integrity and it is impossible to put down." 
- Steve Coll, author of Ghost Wars and The Bin Ladens
"David Rohde and Kristen Mulvihill have a harrowing story to tell about things going very wrong in one of the worst places on earth. But what emerges from this gripping tale is the quiet persistence of decency and bravery, not least the authors'' own." 
- George Packer, author of Interesting Times and The Assassins'' Gate: America in Iraq
"No recent book on Afghanistan gives such breathtaking perspective on what makes the Taliban and al'' Qaeda so lethal and makes the US war effort so ineffective." 
- Ahmed Rashid, author of Taliban & Descent into Chaos
"David Rohde met his match in Kristen Mulvihill, in the best possible sense.  Grace under pressure seems to come naturally to both of them.  Their story is an action diptych, a two-panel nonfiction thriller that combines reportage, great villains, relentless suspense, wildly disparate worlds, and a new marriage put to a torture test for the ages." 
- William Finnegan, author of Cold New World: Growing Up in a Harder Country
"A Rope and a Prayer" is an amazing and devastating book -- not merely a story of human captivity, but also a tale of marriage, friendship, patience and faith." 
- Elizabeth Gilbert, author of Eat, Pray Love
"The precious value of this book is its alternating narration of two people separately sharing a horrendous experience: a husband in captivity on the Afghanistan-Pakistan border struggling with his brutal, feudal, volatile Taliban abductors; and a wife at home in New York living with uncertainty, fear and faith. It is an amazing and intriguing tale of personal intelligence, courage and stamina set in the chaotic context of the Afghan war."
 - Jonathan Moore, U. S. Ambassador to the United Nations, 1989-1992, United States Ambassador at Large for Refugees, 1986-1989

About the Author

David Rohde, winner of two Pulitzer Prizes in journalism, is a reporter for The New York Times and the author of Endgame: The Betrayal and Fall of Srebrenica


Kristen Mulvihill has been a fashion and photography editor at various women''s magazines, including Self and Cosmopolitan. The live in New York.

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4.7 out of 54.7 out of 5
55 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

GrayWolfHowling
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Love Story, A Crime, An Unexpected Ending....
Reviewed in the United States on November 1, 2020
David Rohde and Kristen Mulvihill - two decent people seeking truth in an uncertain world. A Taliban schemer with his radical Islamist jailers. A story that takes place physically in two Nations (Afghanistan and Pakistan) yet crosses the ocean into North America. Seven... See more
David Rohde and Kristen Mulvihill - two decent people seeking truth in an uncertain world. A Taliban schemer with his radical Islamist jailers. A story that takes place physically in two Nations (Afghanistan and Pakistan) yet crosses the ocean into North America. Seven months of threatening; seven months of hoping; seven months of regret. A true story more powerful than fiction. This is the "stuff" non-fiction yearns to have in its bones. This is the story of love transcending time and space. It is a story filled with adventure, love, and an unexpected ending. Read it and enjoy!
One person found this helpful
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Bill McN.
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Thrilling, educational, and real - all at once
Reviewed in the United States on July 15, 2013
"This is not a story of triumph," begins A Rope and A Prayer, but it is - just not triumph as planned. Rohde''s tale of his kidnapping, captivity, and escape are the stuff spy novels hope to achieve, but rarely do. His wife''s telling of her side of the story -... See more
"This is not a story of triumph," begins A Rope and A Prayer, but it is - just not triumph as planned.

Rohde''s tale of his kidnapping, captivity, and escape are the stuff spy novels hope to achieve, but rarely do. His wife''s telling of her side of the story - what she actually saw and felt trying and hoping for his freedom - makes it all more exciting and poignant. Painted with vivid details throughout, the reader feels he''s very much there. Halfway through the book, I had to grab my chair hard, take a deep breath, and remind myself this was not fiction, but something very real. The relief at the end is amazing.

Rohde shows us that his captors fearlessly run a secure and often brutal Taliban state with no ties to any "civilized" government. Pakistan denies it even exists. And those captors clearly know little of us. When they hear of a Vietnamese immigrant going on a rampage in the U.S., they ask if the Vietnamese are Muslims.

Mulvihill works with the NY Times''s worldwide contacts, the highest American officials, private crisis advisors and security "contractors," and shadowy third-worlders who claim direct lines to the kidnappers. All prove powerless to really help, or even find out where her husband is being held. Rohde and his comrade escape by their own wits, and with a fair amount of luck.

A breathtaking ride and a great education on affairs in this both foreign and important part of our world. Highly recommended.
3 people found this helpful
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Cindy H.
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great story told from two sides, great insight on the Taliban issue
Reviewed in the United States on July 10, 2011
I knew about this book after reading an excerpt of it from Vogue magazine. I really enjoyed how the book tells you what happens with a kidnapping both from the victim''s perspective and the family''s. It makes you realize what kidnapping victims'' families go through. I also... See more
I knew about this book after reading an excerpt of it from Vogue magazine. I really enjoyed how the book tells you what happens with a kidnapping both from the victim''s perspective and the family''s. It makes you realize what kidnapping victims'' families go through. I also appreciated the background information about what is happening in Afghanistan and Pakistan, and especially in the Pakistani tribal areas that the terrorists find as a safe haven, that I really, really wish our troops or the local government could just get in there and seriously put an end to all these terrorist acts. It makes me sick to my stomach that ten year old boys wish to become suicide bombers when they grow up, and at the same time my heart goes out for them because these children don''t know any better; they don''t know that there is a better life out there, more fun things for ten years old to play with or worry about.

I also liked that the book tells you about differing opinions about the issues, such as whether or not the local government actually support the Taliban, so it''s not just merely the author''s opinion. I am also glad to learn that our government, and the British, do not negotiate or pay ransom for kidnappings; even though it might be harder for the families to have to deal with, for which the government does provide aide and support, I think it''s an important policy in order not to encourage even more kidnappings. I am also glad to find out that our government, unlike others, consuls and lets the family make the important decisions before they take any action that might involve the safety of the kidnap victim. I am thankful to know that our government respects and values our family values and rights. And I''m definitely thankful that we live in a place where we have freedom and our existence as human beings is highly valued.
One person found this helpful
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Phillip A. Nickel
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Provocative
Reviewed in the United States on December 29, 2012
This account is of a journalist who was kidnapped in 2007 by Taliban extremists in Afghanistan, transported to southern Pakistan and kept prisoner over seven months while experiencing psychological torture, mainly by promises of release that would not come. The story is... See more
This account is of a journalist who was kidnapped in 2007 by Taliban extremists in Afghanistan, transported to southern Pakistan and kept prisoner over seven months while experiencing psychological torture, mainly by promises of release that would not come. The story is alternately told by both the captive and his wife of two months, who seeks aid from various sources for her husband''s safe return.

The tale is intriguing, aggravating and disheartening. Intriguing in learning something about those countries and extreme Islam and related history.

While the husband is captive, we learn of the wife''s inane duties associated with reader''s appeal of "Cosmopolitan" magazine, such as "What does a man''s butt say about him," while she enlists private security companies, government agencies and high administrative officials for help in rescuing her husband.

It was disheartening to realize the extent of unnecessary waste of human, government and monetary sources in participating in rescuing someone who should know better as he had been captive in Bosnia, needed rescuing then and knew of the risks with the Taliban. Further, history given shows that the U.S. should not have engaged in Afghanistan because of numerous failures of other countries over centuries. So the book is valuable for understanding, and developing personal opinions about America''s involvement in other nation''s affairs while there is great need within our own country.
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Jeff Flogel
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I lost sleep reading this one because I couldn''t put it down
Reviewed in the United States on July 24, 2015
Probably not the best book writing, but that''s OK. This book is about telling a tale you can''t read in just any book written by just any person. This is as close to the taliban as you can possibly get as a casual book reader in the U.S. It''s a gripping tale and hard to put... See more
Probably not the best book writing, but that''s OK. This book is about telling a tale you can''t read in just any book written by just any person. This is as close to the taliban as you can possibly get as a casual book reader in the U.S. It''s a gripping tale and hard to put down so I blasted through this one and was kind of disappointed to get to the end because it was so interesting to read. 4 stars only for the quality of the writing. The story itself is 5 stars.
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Michael Brochstein
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Riveting (and educational) true story.
Reviewed in the United States on November 15, 2011
A riveting true story about the kidnapping in Afghanistan of a New York Times reporter. It is told in chapters that alternative in authorship between the kidnapped reporter and his wife back in NYC. In the course of the story we learn a lot about society in Afghanistan... See more
A riveting true story about the kidnapping in Afghanistan of a New York Times reporter. It is told in chapters that alternative in authorship between the kidnapped reporter and his wife back in NYC. In the course of the story we learn a lot about society in Afghanistan and Pakistan, the history of the area and the geo-political forces at work in the region.

Even though we know the ending of the story (the reporter is now free), the story is told in a quick paced, riveting page-turner manner that grabbed my attention and never let go.

Highly recommended!
2 people found this helpful
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MDH
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Lessons under adversity
Reviewed in the United States on January 9, 2016
Both the hostage, David, and his wife, Kristen, tell a very powerful story. David''s story is enhanced by his knowledge and understanding of ethnic, tribal and religious factions in Afghanistan and Pakistan which all Americans need to understand. The lessons... See more
Both the hostage, David, and his wife, Kristen, tell a very powerful story. David''s story is enhanced by his knowledge and understanding of ethnic, tribal and religious factions in Afghanistan and Pakistan which all Americans need to understand.

The lessons learned are valuable for anyone facing difficulties in life.
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PAMALUCHI
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great audio CD
Reviewed in the United States on May 31, 2019
I really enjoyed the story, I think I took some extra road trips and drove extra slow just so I can keep listening.
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